Human Agency and Behavioral Economics: Nudging Fast and Slow. Cass Sunstein, 2017, Book, “This groundbreaking series is designed to make available in book form unique behavioral economic contributions. It provides a publishing opportunity for behavioral economist authors who have a novel perspective and have developed a special ability to integrate economics with other disciplines. It will allow these authors to fully develop
their ideas. In general, it is not a place for narrow technical contributions. Theoretical/conceptual, empirical, and policy contributions are all
welcome.Link

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The Effects of Fiscal Consolidations: Theory and Evidence. Alberto Alesina, May 2017, Paper, “We investigate the macroeconomic effects of fiscal consolidations based upon government spending cuts, transfers cuts and tax hikes. We extend a narrative dataset of fiscal consolidations, finding details on over 3500 measures. Government spending and transfer cuts reduce output by less than tax hikes. Standard New Keynesian models match our results when fiscal shocks are persistent. Wealth effects on aggregate demand mitigates the impact of a persistent spending cut. Static distortions caused by persistent tax hikes cause larger shifts in aggregate supply under sticky prices. This channel explains different sizes of multipliers found in fiscal stimuli compared to consolidation plans.Link

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Corporate Sustainability Disclosure and Financial Performance. George Serafeim, 2017, Paper, “Corporate environmental and social reporting lacks the comparability across companies that is a characteristic of financial information. To address this weakness, Norges Bank Investment Management (NBIM) created analytical frameworks to measure the quality and scope of reporting relating to three focus areas: climate change, water and children’s rights. By translating information published by a global set of companies into standardized data, NBIM has constructed a dataset that can be used for analyzing and comparing companies across time and within sectors.” Link

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Understanding the Political Economy of the Eurozone Crisis. Jeffry Frieden, 2017, Paper, “The Eurozone crisis constitutes a grave challenge to European integration. This article presents an overview of the causes of the crisis and analyzes why it has been so difficult to resolve. We focus on how responses to the crisis were shaped by distributive conflicts both among and within countries. On the international level, debtor and creditor countries have fought over the distribution of responsibility for the accumulated debt; countries with current account surpluses and deficits have fought over who should implement the policies necessary to reduce the current account imbalances. Within countries, interest groups have fought to shift the costs of crisis resolution away from themselves.Link

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The Ambition-Marriage Trade-Off Too Many Single Women Face. Amanda Pallais, May 8, 2017, Paper, “Even today, research shows that men still prefer female partners who are less professionally ambitious than they are. Because of this, many single women face a trade-off: Actions that lead to professional success might be viewed less favorably in the heterosexual marriage market. This trade-off can be pervasive and is not limited to big decisions like volunteering for a leadership role or asking for a promotion. Daily activities such as speaking up in meetings, taking charge of a project, working late, or even certain outfits, haircuts, and makeup can be desirable in one market and not in the other.” Link

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Revisiting Speculative Hyperinflations in Monetary Models. Kenneth Rogoff, May 4, 2017, Paper, “In an interesting and provocative paper in the Journal of Political Economy, John Cochrane (2011) examines a host of New Keynesian and micro-founded models of money demand, and finds them all guilty of arbitrarily assuming uniqueness when, in fact, the whole class of models is generically riddled with multiple-equilibrium problems. He concludes that only the “fiscal theory of the price level”–which posits that the price level simply follows from the government budget constraint–offers a coherent and rigorous theory of the value of money.Link

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No Idea What Trump Means by Reciprocal Tax. Martin Feldstein, May 3, 2017, Video, “Martin Feldstein, professor of economics at Harvard University, discusses his thoughts on tax policy and the Trump administration. He speaks with Bloomberg’s David Westin and Jonathan Ferro on “Bloomberg Daybreak: Americas.” (Source: Bloomberg)” Two Parts –  Link  1 “Reciprocal Tax” Link 2 – “Big Issue is Tax Reform

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Currency Politics in the Developing World. Jeffry Frieden, Spring 2017, Paper, “The exchange rate is often said to be the most important price in any economy, for it affects all other prices. Americans are not used to thinking in these terms, in part because the US economy is relatively closed, and in part because the dollar is the world’s principal reserve currency. Nonetheless, a country’s exchange rate has a powerful impact on its economic activity, and this is especially true for developing countries. Because currency policy structures a country’s economic relations with the rest of the world, it can be crucial in determining a poor country’s developmental prospects.Link

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Subsidizing Health Insurance for Low-Income Adults: Evidence from Massachusetts and Implications for Future Health Reforms. Nathaniel Hendren, Mark Shepard, May 2017, Paper, “How much are low-income individuals willing to pay for health insurance? What are the implications for insurance market reforms that change government subsidies? Using administrative data from Massachusetts’ subsidized insurance exchange in 2009-2013, we exploit discontinuities in the premium subsidy schedule to estimate willingness to pay and costs of insurance among low-income adults. We obtain three main results…Link

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