Poverty and Human Rights. Stephen Marks, 2017, Book Chapter, “This chapter addresses the challenge posed by poverty to the protection of human rights. Human rights define the entitlements considered necessary for a life of dignity in society, including the right to an adequate standard of living, that is, the right to be free from poverty. At this high level of abstraction, the elimination of poverty and realization of human rights are similar in that both clarify what needs to be done so that all human beings enjoy minimal standards of a decent existence. The context for this inquiry is the consensus regarding the imperative of poverty reduction and human rights realization, and the contested interpretations of the relationship between the two. This context will be set out first, followed by a discussion of how international
discourses on human rights and poverty diverge and, finally, how they converge.Link

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Financial Crime, Near Crime, and Chicanery. Richard Freeman, 2017, Book Chapter, “Fraud ‘Directly Related” to Financial Crisis Probed: FBI Agents Could be Reassigned from National Security Due to Booming Caseload Feb 11, 2009 ABCNEWS–“I don’t think we’ve paid enough attention to the mortgage and financial fraud that have so dramatically…Link

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Wages, Prices, and Employment in a Keynesian Long Run. Stephen Marglin, 2017, Paper, “The central question this paper addresses is the same one I explored in my joint work with Amit Bhaduri 25 years ago: under what circumstances are high wages good for employment? I extend our 1990 argument in three directions. First, instead of mark-up pricing, I model labor and product markets separately. The labor supply to the capitalist sector of the economy is assumed à la Lewis to be unlimited. Consequently the wage cannot be determined endogenously but is fixed by an extended notion of subsistence based on Smith, Ricardo, and Marx. For tractability the product market is assumed to be perfectly competitive. The second innovation is to show how disequilibrium adjustment resolves the overdetermination inherent in the model.Link

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Populism and the Economics of Globalization. Dani Rodrik, June 2017, Paper, “Populism may seem like it has come out of nowhere, but it has been on the rise for a while. I argue that economic history and economic theory both provide ample grounds for anticipating that advanced stages of economic globalization would produce a political backlash. While the backlash may have been predictable, the specific form it took was less so. I distinguish between left-wing and right-wing variants of populism, which differ with respect to the societal cleavages that populist politicians highlight. The first has been predominant in Latin America, and the second in Europe. I argue that these different reactions are related to the relative salience of different types of globalization shocks.Link

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New 2025 Global Growth Projections Predict China’s Further Slowdown and the Continued Rise of India. Center for International Development, June 28, 2017, Paper, “The economic pole of global growth has moved over the past few years from China to neighboring India, where it is likely to stay over the coming decade, according to new growth projections presented by researchers at the Center for International Development at Harvard University (CID). Growth in emerging markets is predicted to continue to outpace that of advanced economies, though not uniformly. The projections are optimistic about new growth hubs in East Africa and new segments of Southeast Asia, led by Indonesia and Vietnam. The growth projections are based on measures of each country’s economic complexity, which captures the diversity and sophistication of the productive capabilities embedded in its exports and the ease with which it could further diversify by expanding those capabilities.Link

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What Corporate Bankruptcy Can Teach Us About Morality. Mihir Desai, June 27, 2017, Audio, “Does the world of finance and markets needs a good infusion of humanity? One book examines how how a wider reading of the humanities can help you understand finance and — at the same time — how finance can help you understand the human condition. It’s by economist and Harvard Business School Professor Mihir Desai.  He joined Marketplace Morning Report host David Brancaccio to discuss his latest book, “The Wisdom of Finance: Discovering Humanity in the World of Risk and Return.”Link

 

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Lawrence Summers on Carbon Dividends, Border Tax, Trade. Lawrence Summers, June 20, 2017, Video, “Lawrence Summers, Harvard University Charles W. Eliot Professor and Former U.S. Treasury Secretary, discusses carbon dividends, a border adjustment tax, and U.S. trade agreements. He speaks with Bloomberg’s David Westin on “Bloomberg Daybreak: Americas.” (Source: Bloomberg)Link

 

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Financial Systems, Economic Growth, and Globalization in the Era of the Cold War. Niall Ferguson, 2017, Book Chapter, “Financial historians have long been interested in the relationship between financial innovation and economic growth (eg, Rousseau and Sylla 2003). From the rise of the Dutch Republic to the golden age of the pax americana, banks, capital markets, and other…Link

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The Effects of Fuel Prices, Regulations, and Other Factors on U.S. Coal Production, 2008-2016. John Coglianese, James Stock, June 15, 2017, Paper, “As is shown in Figure 1, between 2008 and 2015, U.S. coal production fell from 1,172 million tons to 897 million tons and coal employment fell from 87,000 to 66,000. In 2016, coal production declined further, to 739 million tons, 37% below its 2008 level. It is widely understood that a primary factor in this decline has been the sharp decline in natural gas prices, which has led to the substitution of natural gas for coal in electricity generation. In 2008, the national average price of natural gas delivered to an electricity generator nationally was 4.3times the price of coal, on a Btu basis; by 2016, this relative price had fallen to 1.4 as a result of the development and spread of fracking. This national decline masks regional variation, with natural gas prices being even more competitive in some regions. For the first time, in 2016 electricity generated from gas overtook generation from coal.Link

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The Eurozone Must Reform or Die. Kenneth Rogoff, June 14, 2017, Opinion, “With the election of a reform-minded centrist president in France and the re-election of German Chancellor Angela Merkel seeming ever more likely, is there hope for the stalled single-currency project in Europe? Perhaps, but another decade of slow growth, punctuated by periodic debt-related convulsions, still looks more likely. With a determined move toward fiscal and banking union, things could be much better. But, in the absence of policies to strengthen stability and sustainability, the chances of an eventual collapse are much greater.Link

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