Found 553 article(s) in category 'Regulation'

Publish the Secret Rules for Banks’ Living Wills

Publish the Secret Rules for Banks’ Living Wills. Hal Scott, June 10, 2016, Opinion. “The Federal Reserve and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. recently determined that five of America’s largest banks do not have credible plans to go through bankruptcy without relying on extraordinary government support. If these five firms— J.P. Morgan Chase, Bank of America, Wells Fargo, Bank of New York Mellon and State Street—can’t develop “living wills” that satisfy regulators, then the Dodd-Frank Act authorizes the government to break them up as soon as 2018.Link

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The Overselling of Financial Transaction Taxes

The Overselling of Financial Transaction Taxes. Kenneth Rogoff, June 6, 2016, Opinion. “However November’s presidential election in the United States turns out, one proposal that will likely live on is the introduction of a financial transaction tax (FTT). While by no means a crazy idea, an FTT is hardly the panacea that its hard-left advocates hold it out to be. It is certainly a poor substitute for deeper tax reform aimed at making the system simpler, more transparent, and more progressive.” Link

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Doing Bad by Doing Good? Theft and Abuse by Lenders in the Microfinance Markets of Uganda

Doing Bad by Doing Good? Theft and Abuse by Lenders in the Microfinance Markets of Uganda. Catherine Duggan, June 2016, Paper. “Microcredit transactions in developing countries create risks for borrowers that are routinely overlooked in the literature. This paper argues that common microfinance-lending methodologies that allow lenders to collateralize loans and unilaterally collect this security create opportunities for malicious lenders to steal from clients in good standing. In places where any lender can simply call itself a “microfinance institution” (MFI), opportunistic lenders can use the halo effect associated with microfinance to encourage borrowers to make themselves unusually vulnerable to theft. Evidence of these abuses can be seen in a case study of Uganda, where theft and fraud by a small number of microfinance institutions created a large-scale crisis and contributed to a precipitous decline in trust in the financial sector as a whole.Link

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The Volcker Rule as structural law: implications for cost-benefit analysis and administrative law

The Volcker Rule as structural law: implications for cost-benefit analysis and administrative law. John Coates, 2016, Paper. “The Volcker rule, a key part of Congress’s response to the financial crisis, is best understood as a “structural law,” a traditional Anglo-American technique for governance of hybrid public-private institutions such as banks and central banks. The tradition extends much farther back in time than the Glass-Steagall Act, to which the Volcker Rule has been unfavorably (but unfairly) compared. The goals of the Volcker Rule are complex and ambitious, and not limited to reducing risk directly, but include reshaping banks’ organizational cultures. Another body of structural laws, part of the core of administrative law, attempts to restrain and discipline regulatory agencies, through process requirements such as cost-benefit analysis (CBA). Could the Volcker rule be the subject of reliable, precise, quantified CBA? Given the nature of the Volcker rule as structural law, its ambitions, and the current capacities of CBA, the answer is clearly “no,” as it would require regulators to anticipate, in advance of data, private market behavior in response to novel activity constraints.Link

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Open Access to Infrastructure Networks: The Experience of Railroads

Open Access to Infrastructure Networks: The Experience of Railroads. Jose Gomez-Ibanez, June 1, 2016, Paper, “Many countries have restructured their railroads and other network industries to require that network providers grant access to independent companies. The potential benefit is to introduce competition among the access users, while the potential cost is to reduce coordination between the network provider and the access users. The experiences of railroads in Australia, Europe, and North America caution that coordination costs are likely to be high when the access provider/user interface is technically complex, the network is close to capacity, the access users are heterogeneous, there is little reciprocity between providers and users, and the access grants are broad.Link

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Understanding Agricultural Price Range Systems as Trade Restraints: Peru – Agricultural Products

Understanding Agricultural Price Range Systems as Trade Restraints: Peru – Agricultural Products. Mark Wu, April 2016, Paper. “An agricultural price range system (PRS) aims to stabilize local prices in an open economy via the use of import duties that vary with international prices. The policy is inherently distortionary and welfare-reducing for a small open economy, at least according to the canonical economic model. We offer an explanation for why a government concerned with national welfare may nevertheless implement such a policy when faced with risk aversion and imperfect insurance markets. We also highlight open questions arising out of the Peru – Agricultural Products dispute for the WTO’s Appellate Body to address in order to clarify how a PRS consistent with WTO rules could be designed.Link

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Federal Coal Program Reform, the Clean Power Plan, and the Interaction of Upstream and Downstream Climate Policies

Federal Coal Program Reform, the Clean Power Plan, and the Interaction of Upstream and Downstream Climate Policies. James Stock, April 2016, Paper. “Coal mined on federally managed lands accounts for approximately 40% of U.S. coal consumption and 13% of total U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions. The U.S. Department of the Interior is undertaking a programmatic review of federal coal leasing, including the climate effects of burning federal coal. This paper studies the interaction between a specific upstream policy, incorporating a carbon adder into federal coal royalties, and downstream emissions regulation under the Clean Power Plan (CPP). After providing some comparative statics, we present quantitative results from a detailed dynamic model of the power sector, the Integrated Planning Model (IPM). The IPM analysis indicates that, in the absence of the CPP, a royalty adder equal to the social cost of carbon could reduce emissions by roughly 3/4 of the emissions reduction that the CPP is projected to achieve.Link

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A Conversation With Robert D. Putnam

A Conversation With Robert D. Putnam. Robert Putnam, March 16, 2016, Video. “A best-selling author and professor at the Harvard Kennedy School, Robert Putnam is one of America’s leading political scientists. In recent years, he has written widely on the decline in America’s civic life, and, with it, our capacity for self-government. In this conversation, Putnam discusses his research on declining levels of civic participation in America and presents his interpretation of the reasons for it. Putnam also recalls how actual political developments awakened his interest in political science, and explains how social science might help us address public policy problems,” writes the Foundation for Constitutional Government, the sponsor of the series.Link

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Silk-Road Type Projects: Lessons From Some Historical Examples

Silk-Road Type Projects: Lessons From Some Historical Examples. Robert Z. Lawrence, 2016, Book Chapter. “China’s Belt and Road Initiative is a project of truly historic proportions. If successful, it has the potential to deliver significant benefits to China and its neighbors. To realize this potential, both China and the recipient nations must overcome numerous institutional challenges. This chapter draws on a variety of historical experiences to explore the nature of these challenges. It does so not to argue that history will repeat itself or to imply that the project replicates the precise conditions of the examples chosen but to reflect on what history tells us about both the potential and pitfalls that have been associated with such endeavors in the past.Link

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Demand Response: Getting the Prices Right

Demand Response: Getting the Prices Right. William Hogan, March 2016, Paper. “The legal issue over the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s (FERC) jurisdictional authority to set demand response prices is settled. In the so-called EPSA (Electric Power Supply Association) case, the Supreme Court found for FERC in support of its demand response Rule in Order 745. The second part of the decision addressed the compensation for demand response. Here the Supreme Court held that FERC had followed procedures to ensure that its demand response pricing mechanism is not arbitrary and capricious. The Order 745 demand response compensation mechanism calls for paying the Locational Marginal Price (LMP). The issue here is about the efficiency and incentives of this pricing rule. Link

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