Found 300 article(s) in category 'Jobs and Unemployment'

Do Political Connections Reduce Job Creation? Evidence from Lebanon

Do Political Connections Reduce Job Creation? Evidence from Lebanon. Ishac Diwan, July 1, 2016, Paper. “Using firm-level census data, we determine how politically-connected firms (PCFs) reduce job creation in Lebanon. After observing that large firms account for the bulk of net job creation, we find that PCFs are larger and create more jobs, but are also less productive, than non-PCFs in their sectors. On a net basis, at the sector-level, each additional PCF reduces jobs created by 7.2% and jobs created by non-PCFs by 11.3%. These findings support the notion that politically-connected firms are used for clientelistic purposes in Lebanon, exchanging privileges for jobs that benefit their patrons? supporters.Link

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Home-Based Workers and Cities

Home-Based Workers and Cities. Martha Chen, 2016, Paper. “This paper explores the impact of local government policies and urban plans on home-based workers. It presents recent national data on the size and composition of home-based work in developing countries as well as findings from two recent field studies of urban home-based workers in several Asian cities/countries. The research findings highlight that homes often double as workplaces, especially for women workers, and that slums are domains of significant economic activities. Reflecting these twin facts, as well as the demands of home-based workers, the paper makes the case that city governments and urban planners need to integrate home-based workers and their livelihood activities into local economic development plans. It also argues that city governments need to extend basic infrastructure to the homes-cum-workplaces of home-based workers, as well as transport services to the settlements where they live and work. The paper provides some promising examples of where and how this has been done, largely in response to effective advocacy by organizations of home-based workers.Link

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Technology, informal workers and cities: insights from Ahmedabad (India), Durban (South Africa) and Lima (Peru)

Technology, informal workers and cities: insights from Ahmedabad (India), Durban (South Africa) and Lima (Peru). Martha Chen, 2016, Paper. “Technology is a key driver of change, not least in the world of work. Yet little is known about what technologies are used by – or impact on – the working poor in the informal economy, and in what ways. This paper presents findings from a 2015 study by the WIEGO network and local partners in three cities: Ahmedabad, India; Durban, South Africa; and Lima, Peru. The findings reveal that informal workers in the study cities are using diverse tools, from manual devices to electrical equipment and internet platforms, to strengthen their livelihoods. Overall, the tools used tend to be basic. Often they are being adapted in ingenious ways in order to adapt to resource and other constraints. Take-up of improved tools is limited by low incomes and concerns about theft and confiscation. It is also affected by city-level, context-specific systems of energy, transport and waste. This paper summarizes which types of technologies are most useful to different sectors of informal workers. It argues that the policy and regulatory environment, and city-wide technological systems, should be more responsive to the technological and other needs of the urban informal workforce.Link

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The Informal Economy: Recent Trends, Future Directions

The Informal Economy: Recent Trends, Future Directions. Martha Chen, June 1, 2016, Paper. “Informal employment represents more than half of nonagricultural employment in most developing regions, contributes to the overall economy, and provides pathways to reduction of poverty and inequality. Support to the informal economy should include the expansion of occupational health and safety to include informal workers, based on an analysis of their work places and work risks. The paper presents main schools of thought and argues for a holistic understanding of the different segments of the informal work force and for policies and interventions tailored to the needs and constraints of these different segments. The paper recommends a policy approach which seeks to extend social protection, including occupational health and safety services, to informal workers, and to increase the productivity of informal enterprises and informal workers through an enabling environment and support services.Link

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On Equal Pay Day, Why The Gender Gap Still Exists

On Equal Pay Day, Why The Gender Gap Still Exists. Claudia Goldin, April 12, 2016, Audio. “President Obama has declared today Equal Pay Day. There’s a reason it falls on April 12. As the proclamation says, today marks how far into the new year women would have to work in order to earn the same as men did in the previous year. Women, on average, make 79 cents for every dollar men earn. Harvard economics professor Claudia Goldin has looked into the reasons for this, and you say the reason is not primarily discrimination. Is that right?Link

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The Association Between Income and Life Expectancy in the United States, 2001-2014

The Association Between Income and Life Expectancy in the United States, 2001-2014. Raj Chetty, April 10, 2016, Paper. “Importance: The relationship between income and life expectancy is well established but remains poorly understood.  Objectives” To measure the level, time trend, and geographic variability in the association between income and life expectancy and to identify factors related to small area variation.  Design and Setting: Income data for the US population were obtained from 1.4 billion deidentified tax records between 1999 and 2014. Mortality data were obtained from Social Security Administration death records. These data were used to estimate race- and ethnicity-adjusted life expectancy at 40 years of age by household income percentile, sex, and geographic area, and to evaluate factors associated with differences in life expectancy.Link

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Richard Parker on Jobs, Financial Crises, and Inequality

Richard Parker on Jobs, Financial Crises, and Inequality April 2016. GrowthPolicy staff member Marzena Rogalska interviewed Harvard Kennedy School Professor Richard Parker, focusing on three key questions motivating the GrowthPolicy website. Below is an edited version of Professor Parker’s comments. Click here for more interviews like this one. Where will jobs come from? | How […]

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Adjustment and Income Distribution Impacts on the TPP

Adjustment and Income Distribution Impacts on the TPP. Robert Lawrence, April 2016, Book Chapter. “Like all free trade agreements, the Trans-Pacifi c Partnership (TPP) will yield gains to the economy in general but force difficult adjustments on some workers and businesses. Peter A. Petri and Michael G. Plummer (2016) find that the agreement will benefi t the United States as a whole, raise real wages of both skilled and unskilled workers, and increase the real return to capital. It will, however, hurt some workers. In particular, some workers will be displaced by imports and lose income from being unemployed or earning less in their new jobs.Link

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Tax Aversion in Labor Supply

Tax Aversion in Labor Supply. Michael I. Norton, April 2016, Paper. “In a real-effort laboratory experiment, labor supply decreases more with the introduction of a tax than with a financially equivalent drop in wages. This “tax aversion” is large in magnitude: when we decompose the productivity decrease that arises from taxation, we estimate that 40% is due to the lower net wage and the remaining 60% to tax aversion. This tax aversion affects labor supply more on the extensive margin (working less) than on the intensive margin (being less productive while working). The aversion is equally strong whether tax revenue goes to the U.S. government or back to the experimenter (a “laboratory tax”). We discuss the implications of our results for the relationship between labor supply and taxation.Link

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The Labor Supply of Undocumented Immigrants

The Labor Supply of Undocumented Immigrants. George Borjas, March 2016, Paper. “The Department of Homeland Security estimates that 11.4 million undocumented persons reside in the United States. Congress and President Obama are considering a number of proposals to regularize the status of the undocumented population and provide a “path to citizenship.” Any future change in the immigration status of this group is bound to have significant effects on the labor market, on the number of persons that qualify for various government-provided benefits, on the timing of retirement, on the size of the population receiving Social Security benefits, and on the funding of almost all of these government programs. This paper provides a comprehensive empirical study of the labor supply behavior of undocumented immigrants in the United States.Link

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