Found 518 article(s) in category 'Inequality'

Discrimination in a Low-Wage Labor Market: A Field Experiment

Discrimination in a Low-Wage Labor Market: A Field Experiment. Bruce Western, October 1, 2009, Paper. “Decades of racial progress have led some researchers and policymakers to doubt that discrimination remains an important cause of economic inequality. To study contemporary discrimination, we conducted a field experiment in the low-wage labor market of New York City, recruiting white, black, and Latino job applicants who were matched on demographic characteristics and interpersonal skills. These applicants were given equivalent résumés and sent to apply in tandem for hundreds of entry-level jobs. Our results show that black applicants…” Link

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Health Insurance Exchanges — Making the Markets Work

Health Insurance Exchanges – Making the Markets Work. Richard Frank, Richard Zeckhauser, September 17, 2009, Article. “Americans purchase health insurance in various ways. Some buy individual policies. For them, medical underwriting is common, and preexisting conditions can preclude, limit, or dramatically increase the cost of coverage. Many buy insurance through small employers, which typically offer little or no choice of plan. Their premiums tend to be higher than those of consumers purchasing through large employers, which can bargain effectively on prices. Large employers usually offer a modest selection of high-quality…” Link

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The Future of Inequality: The Other Reason Education Matters So Much

The Future of Inequality: The Other Reason Education Matters So Much, Lawrence Katz, Claudia Goldin, August 22, 2009, Paper. “As almost every economic policy maker is aware, the gap between the wages of educated and less-educated workers has been growing since the early 1980s – and that change has been both large and pervasive even when the measurement is narrowed by gender, industry or occupation. What’s not widely known, though, is that expanding wage inequality is a relatively new phenomenon. In fact, inequality actually narrowed from around 1910 to the 1950s, and then remained fairly stable until the 1980s…” Link 

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Mitigating the Potential Inequity of Reducing Corporate Rates

Mitigating the Potential Inequity of Reducing Corporate Rates. Daniel Halperin, July 29, 2009, Paper. “Since the statutory marginal U.S. income tax rate on corporate income is higher than the marginal rate imposed by all of our trading partners except Japan, there have been a number of proposals to reduce the U.S. marginal corporate rate. At the same time, it seems likely that the top individual rate will be increased. However, a differential between marginal corporate and individual rates could reduce the overall rate of tax on corporate distributions and enable higher-income taxpayers to shelter their income from services or...” Link

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Selection Stories: Understanding Movement Across Health Plans

Selection Stories: Understanding Movement Across Health Plans. David Cutler, Richard Zeckhauser, July 2009, Paper. “This study assesses the factors influencing the movement of people across health plans. We distinguish three types of cost-related transitions: adverse selection, the movement of the less healthy to more generous plans; adverse retention, the tendency for people to stay where they are when they get sick; and aging in place, where lack of all movement makes plans with initially older enrollees increase in cost over time. Using data from the Group Insurance Commission in Massachusetts, we show that aging in…” Link

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Do Rising Top Incomes Lift All Boats?

Do Rising Top Incomes Lift All Boats? Daniel Andrews, Christopher Jencks, Andrew Leigh. June 15, 2009, Paper. “Pooling data for 1905 to 2000, we find no systematic relationship between top income shares and economic growth in a panel of 12 developed nations observed for between 22 and 85 years. After 1960, however, a one percentage point rise in the top decile’s income share is associated with a statistically significant 0.12 point rise in GDP growth during the following year…” Link

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The Wealth of Cities: Agglomeration Economies and Spatial Equilibrium in the United States

The Wealth of Cities: Agglomeration Economies and Spatial Equilibrium in the United States. Edward Glaeser, March 2009, Paper. “Empirical research on cities starts with a spatial equilibrium condition: workers and firms are assumed to be indifferent across space. This condition implies that research on cities is different from research on countries, and that work on places within countries needs to consider population, income and housing prices simultaneously. Housing supply elasticity will determine whether urban success shows up in more people or higher incomes. Urban economists generally…” May require purchase or user account. Link

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The Causal Impact of Education on Economic Growth: Evidence from U.S.

The Causal Impact of Education on Economic Growth: Evidence from U.S. Philippe Aghion, March 2009, Paper. “Should countries or regions (generically, “states”) invest more in education to promote economic growth? Policy makers often assert that if their state spends more on educating its population, incomes will grow sufficiently to more than recover the investment. Economists and others have proposed many channels through which education may affect growth–not merely the private returns to individuals’ greater human capital but also a variety of externalities…” Link

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Can political affirmative action for women reduce gender bias?

Can political affirmative action for women reduce gender bias? Rohini Pande, January 8, 2009, Article. ““While women have the legal right to equal participation in politics in almost every country around the world, they remain vastly underrepresented in local and national politics. As of July 2006, women accounted for only 17% of parliamentarians worldwide, and a woman headed the government in only seven countries (UNICEF, 2007). These numbers vary dramatically by region. In 2004, the highest share of female parliamentarians was found in the Nordic countries (39.7%), while the lowest was in the Arab States (6%)…” Link

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The Global Gender Gap Report 2009

The Global Gender Gap Report 2009. Ricardo Hausmann, 2009, Paper. “Over the last year, the world has seen the biggest recession in almost a century. It is clear that recovery will require, among other things, the best of talent, ideas and innovation. It is therefore more important now than ever before for countries and companies to pay heed to one of the fundamental cornerstones of economic growth available to them—the skills and talent of their female human resource pool. As consumers, voters, employees and employers, women will be integral…” Link

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