Found 526 article(s) in category 'Inequality'

“Schooling Can’t Buy Me Love”: Marriage, Work, and the Gender Education Gap in Latin America

“Schooling Can’t Buy Me Love”: Marriage, Work, and the Gender Education Gap in Latin America. Ricardo Hausmann, July 2010, Paper. “In this paper we establish six stylized facts related to marriage and work in Latin America and present a simple model to account for them. First, skilled women are less likely to be married than unskilled women. Second, skilled women are less likely to be married than skilled men. Third, married skilled men are more likely to work than unmarried skilled men, but married skilled women are less likely to work than unmarried skilled women. Fourth, Latin American women…” Link

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Predicting Agri-Commodity Prices: An Asset Pricing Approach

Predicting Agri-Commodity Prices: An Asset Pricing Approach. Kenneth Rogoff, May 10, 2010, Paper. “Volatile and rising agricultural prices put significant strain on the global fight against poverty. An accurate reading of future food price movements can be an invaluable budgetary planning tool for various government agencies and food aid programs. Using the asset-pricing approach developed in Chen, Rogoff and Rossi (2010), we show that information from the currency and equity markets of several major commodity-exporting economies can help forecast world agricultural…” (May require user account or purchase) Link

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Do Traditional Institutions Constrain Female Entrepreneurship? A Field Experiment on Business Training in India

Do Traditional Institutions Constrain Female Entrepreneurship? A Field Experiment on Business Training in India, Rohini Pande, May 2010, Paper, “What constrains the entrepreneurial choices of poor women? Do traditional institutions pose unique barriers to business growth and profitability for female-run enterprises? The explosion of microfinance programs, which typically target poor female entrepreneurs, has drawn attention to these questions. Indeed, one view is that inadequate access to credit prevents women from under- taking high-return business activities. However, one recent empirical study finds low returns to capital in female-run micro-enterprises.” Link

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Spreading the Wealth Around: Reflections Inspired by Joe the Plumber

Spreading the Wealth Around: Reflections Inspired by Joe the Plumber. N. Gregory Mankiw, March 2010, Paper. “This essay discusses the policy debate concerning optimal taxation and the distribution of income. It begins with a brief overview of trends in income inequality, the leading hypothesis to explain these trends, and the distribution of the tax burden. It then considers the framework that economists use to address the normative problem of designing tax systems. The conventional utilitarian approach is found to be wanting, as it leads to prescriptions that conflict with many individuals’ moral intuitions. The essay…” Link

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The Global Gender Gap Report 2010

 The Global Gender Gap Report 2010. Ricardo Hausmann, 2010, Paper. “Nordic countries Iceland, Norway, Finland and Sweden continue to demonstrate the greatest equality between men and women, according to the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Report 2010. The Global Gender Gap Index was created with the specific purpose of being comparable across time. The 2010 Report aggregates five years of data and seeks to reveal country progress in a transparent manner…” Link

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Framing Race and Poverty

Framing Race and Poverty. William Julius Wilson, November 1, 2009, Opinion. “One thing I know is that it’s extremely important to discuss how race and poverty are framed in public policy discussions. How we situate social issues in the larger context of society says a lot about our commitment to change. As rhetorician Robert Asen has pointed out, the political framing of poverty—that is, how politicians formulate arguments about how we as a nation should talk about and address issues of poverty—in the New Deal era was quite different from today. Back then, the emphasis was on structure—namely, the devastating impact of the economic crisis…” Link

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Global Imbalances and the Financial Crisis: Products of Common Causes

Global Imbalances and the Financial Crisis: Products of Common Causes, Kenneth Rogoff, October 2009, Paper. “Until the outbreak of financial crisis in August 2007, the mid-2000s was a period of strong economic performance throughout the world. Economic growth was generally robust; inflation generally low; international trade and especially financial flows expanded; and the emerging and developing world experienced widespread progress and a notable absence of crises. This apparently favorable equilibrium was underpinned, however, by three trends that appeared increasingly unsustainable as time went by…” Link

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Inequality in Cities

Inequality in CitiesEdward Glaeser, Kristina Tobio, October 1, 2009, Paper. “Much of the inequality literature has focused on national inequality, but local inequality is also important. Crime rates are higher in more unequal cities; people in unequal cities are more likely to say that they are unhappy. There is a negative association between local inequality and the growth of city-level income and population, once we control for the initial distribution of skills. High levels of mobility across cities mean that city-level inequality should not be studied with the same analytical tools used…” May require purchase or user account. Link

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Discrimination in a Low-Wage Labor Market: A Field Experiment

Discrimination in a Low-Wage Labor Market: A Field Experiment. Bruce Western, October 1, 2009, Paper. “Decades of racial progress have led some researchers and policymakers to doubt that discrimination remains an important cause of economic inequality. To study contemporary discrimination, we conducted a field experiment in the low-wage labor market of New York City, recruiting white, black, and Latino job applicants who were matched on demographic characteristics and interpersonal skills. These applicants were given equivalent résumés and sent to apply in tandem for hundreds of entry-level jobs. Our results show that black applicants…” Link

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Health Insurance Exchanges — Making the Markets Work

Health Insurance Exchanges – Making the Markets Work. Richard Frank, Richard Zeckhauser, September 17, 2009, Article. “Americans purchase health insurance in various ways. Some buy individual policies. For them, medical underwriting is common, and preexisting conditions can preclude, limit, or dramatically increase the cost of coverage. Many buy insurance through small employers, which typically offer little or no choice of plan. Their premiums tend to be higher than those of consumers purchasing through large employers, which can bargain effectively on prices. Large employers usually offer a modest selection of high-quality…” Link

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