Found 202 article(s) in category 'Q1: Jobs?'

WHERE WILL JOBS COME FROM?

The posts collected here identify the firms, industries, and geographic locations where the jobs of the future will likely emerge.  They also consider the public policies that have the best chance of fostering the types of jobs that will support a robust middle class.

Tackling ‘the Thin File’ That Can Prevent a Promotion

Tackling ‘the Thin File’ That Can Prevent a Promotion. Iris Bohnet, October 3, 2017, Opinion, “Recently, I have worked with a number of professional services firms committed to equality, diversity and inclusion. Many offer diversity training and leadership development programs, and many support affinity groups for traditionally underrepresented groups.  However, none has been able to crack what sometimes feels like a code set in stone: significantly increased diversity at the entry level, but very little change at the top.Link

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Green Industrial Policy: Accelerating Structural Change towards Wealthy Green Economies

Green Industrial Policy: Accelerating Structural Change towards Wealthy Green Economies. Dani Rodrik, 2017, Paper, “There are two major reasons for governments and societies to accelerate structural change in their economies and proactively shape its direction. First, there is the challenge of creating wealth. Structural change, that is, the reallocation of capital and labour from low- to high-productivity activities, is a key driver of productivity growth and higher incomes. This is particularly important for developing countries where incomes are low and poverty is pervasive. According to the latest available estimates, 767 million people lived on less than $1.90 a day, and 1.9 billion people in the developing world still had less than US $ 3.10 a day in 20131 – a clear indication that the current structural composition of national economies does not provide a sufficient number of productive jobs.Link

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Expanding the Earned Income Tax Credit for Workers Without Dependent Children

Expanding the Earned Income Tax Credit for Workers Without Dependent Children. Lawrence Katz, September 2017, Paper, “In recent decades, wage inequality in the United States has increased and real wages for less-skilled workers have declined. As a result, many American workers are unable to adequately support their families through work, even working full time. The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) has helped to counter this trend and has become one of the nation’s most effective antipoverty policies. But most of its benefits have gone to workers with children. The maximum credit available to workers without dependent children is just over $500, and workers lose eligibility entirely once their annual earnings reach $15,000.Link

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The Productivity Slowdown and the Declining Labor Share: A Neoclassical Exploration

The Productivity Slowdown and the Declining Labor Share: A Neoclassical Exploration. Elhanan Helpman, September 2017, Paper, “We explore the possibility that a global productivity slowdown is responsible for the widespread decline in the labor share of national income. In a neoclassical growth model with endogenous human capital accumulation a la Ben Porath (1967) and capital-skill complementarity a la Grossman et al. (2017), the steady-state labor share is positively correlated with the rates of capital-augmenting and labor-augmenting technological progress. We calibrate the key parameters describing the balanced growth path to U.S. data for the early postwar period and find that a one percentage point slowdown in the growth rate of per capita income can account for between one half and all of the observed decline in the U.S. labor share.Link

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It’s Time to Balance the Power between Workers and Employers

It’s Time to Balance the Power between Workers and Employers. Lawrence Summers, September 3, 2017, Opinion, “The central issue in American politics is the economic security of the middle class and their sense of opportunity for their children. As long as a substantial majority of American adults believe that their children will not live as well as they did, our politics will remain bitter and divisive.Link

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The Slow Recovery in Output after 2009

The Slow Recovery in Output after 2009. James Stock, 2017, Paper, “The U.S. economy has been expanding slowly since the recession trough in 2009. Though unemployment has declined at about the same rate as in previous recoveries, output has grown much more slowly than in the past. We explore explanations for the shortfall in output growth, using a quantitative decomposition based on growth economics. Two components of the decomposition stand out: slow growth in productivity, and a growing shortfall of labor-force participation relative to its demographic determinants. The slow growth in both components predated the recession. Our analysis gives a full treatment to cyclical effects.Link

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Informal worker organising and mobilisation

 Informal worker organising and mobilisation, Martha Chen, 2017, Book Chapter, “The Routledge Companion to Planning in the Global South offers an edited collection on planning in parts of the world which, more often than not, are unrecognised or unmarked in mainstream planning texts. In doing so, its intention is not to fill a ‘gap’ that leaves this ‘mainstream’ unquestioned but to re-theorise planning from a deep understanding of ‘place’ as well as a commitment to recognise the diverse modes of practice that come within it.Link

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Incentives Versus Reciprocity: Insights from a Field Experiment

Incentives Versus Reciprocity: Insights from a Field Experiment. Doug Chung, Das Narayandas, August 2017, Paper, “The authors conduct a field experiment in which they vary the sales force compensation scheme at an Asian enterprise that sells consumer durable goods. With variation generated by the experimental treatments, the authors model sales force performance to identify the effectiveness of various forms of conditional and unconditional compensation.Link

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