Found 418 article(s) in category 'Q3: Financial Crisis?'

Mnuchin’s Mission

Mnuchin’s Mission. Jeffrey Frankel, March 22, 2017, Opinion, “US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin is hemmed in on all sides. Domestically, he’s trapped between the promises he has made (such as the “Mnuchin rule” that taxes wouldn’t be cut for the rich), the actions of President Donald Trump (whose tax plan includes cuts for the rich), and simple arithmetic (which makes the administration’s conflicting pledges impossible to fulfill). But even on the international stage, where US treasury secretaries typically enjoy more latitude and esteem, Mnuchin is likely to have a hard time.Link

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The Disappointing Recovery of Output after 2009

The Disappointing Recovery of Output after 2009. James Stock, March 10, 2017, Paper, “U.S. output has been expanding only slowly since the recession trough in 2009 even though unemployment has declined as fast as previous recoveries. We use a quantitative growth-accounting decomposition to explore explanations for the output shortfall, giving full treatment to cyclical effects that, given the depth of the recession, should have implied unusually fast growth. We find that the growth shortfall has almost entirely reflected two factors: TFP has grown slowly and labor force participation fell. Both factors reflect powerful adverse forces largely—if not entirely—unrelated to the financial crisis and the U.S. recession. Indeed, these forces fairly clearly were in play before the recession. The noncyclical forces we study resulted in a shortfall of capital formation that holds back output even today.Link

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The Financial Regulatory Reform Agenda in 2017

The Financial Regulatory Reform Agenda in 2017. Robin Greenwood, Samuel Hanson, Jeremy Stein, Adi Sunderam, February 2017, Paper, “We take stock of the post-crisis financial regulatory reform agenda. We highlight and summarize areas of clear progress, where post-crisis reforms should either be maintained or built upon. We then identify several areas where the new regulations could be streamlined or rolled back in an effort to reduce the burden on the financial sector, particularly on smaller banks.Link

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Larry Summers is worried about ‘enormous damage’ to the economy

Larry Summers is worried about ‘enormous damage’ to the economy. Lawrence Summers, February 27, 2017, Video, “Former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers had strong words for the economic policies and the rhetoric coming from the Trump Administration. In a wide-ranging interview in his offices at Harvard University, Summers called the new administration’s pronouncements on trade for instance “wildly irresponsible” and “potentially very dangerous.” ” Link

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How The Great Recession Changed Economic Thought

How The Great Recession Changed Economic Thought. Edward Glaeser, 2017, Book, “The past three decades have been characterized by vast change and crises in global financial markets—and not in politically unstable countries but in the heart of the developed world, from the Great Recession in the United States to the banking crises in Japan and the Eurozone. As we try to make sense of what caused these crises and how we might reduce risk factors and prevent recurrence, the fields of finance and economics have also seen vast change, as scholars and researchers have advanced their thinking to better respond to the recent crises.Link

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Summers Says Markets Underestimating Risks of Trump Presidency

Summers Says Markets Underestimating Risks of Trump Presidency. Lawrence Summers, January 3, 2017, Video, “Former U.S. Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers said investors are being far too sanguine about the risks associated with Donald Trump’s incoming administration. The Harvard professor, a Democrat who was Treasury chief under Bill Clinton, cited the possibility of protectionist measures by the U.S. as well as changes to foreign policy and domestic social policy as issues that are creating “extraordinary uncertainty.”” Link

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Understanding the Political Economy of the Eurozone Crisis: A Political Scientist’s Guide

Understanding the political economy of the Eurozone crisis: A Political Scientist’s Guide. Jeffry Frieden, 2017, Paper, “The Eurozone crisis constitutes a grave challenge to European integration. This essay presents an overview of the causes of the crisis, and analyzes why has it been so difficult to resolve. It focuses on how responses to the crisis were shaped by distributive conflicts both among and within countries. On the international level, debtor and creditor countries have fought over the distribution of responsibility for the accumulated debt; countries with current account surpluses and deficits have fought over who should implement the policies necessary to reduce the current account imbalances.Link

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Real Estate Bubbles and Urban Development

Real Estate Bubbles and Urban Development. Edward Glaeser, December 2016, Paper, “Why are real estate bubbles so common? Can these bubbles actually do some good? Real estate booms have regularly occurred throughout the world leaving painful busts and financial crises in their wake. This paper suggests that real estate is a natural investment for more passive debt investors, including banks, because real estate’s flexibility makes it better collateral than specifically built production facilities. Passive capital’s preference for real estate will be particularly strong when agency problems bedevil equity investments. Consequently, passive capital may flow disproportionately into real estate and the errors of passive capital can generate real estate bubbles.Link

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