Found 413 article(s) in category 'Q3: Financial Crisis?'

The Rise of Economic Insecurity in the EU: Concepts and Measures

The Rise of Economic Insecurity in the EU: Concepts and Measures. Jason Beckfield, 2017, Paper, “Economic instability, an array of social changes, and welfare state retrenchment place the question of economic insecurity high on the scholarly and political agenda. We contribute to thesedebates by drawing conceptual distinctions between inequality and insecurity. Fundamentally,inequality concerns the distribution of resources across individuals, while insecurity concerns exposure to multiple social risks that can deteriorate living conditions. The multiplicity and dynamism of insecurity inform our development of a new measure of economic insecurity, using longitudinal data from the EU-SILC database. Substantively, we then use our new measure to analyze the distribution of insecurity in Europe.Link

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Impact of Reporting Frequency on UK Public Companies

Impact of Reporting Frequency on UK Public Companies. Robert Pozen, 2017, Paper, “Beginning in 2007, UK public companies were required to issue quarterly, rather than semiannual, financial reports. But the UK removed this quarterly reporting requirement in 2014. We studied the effects of these regulatory changes on UK public companies and found that the frequency of financial reports had no material impact on levels of corporate investment. However, mandatory quarterly reporting was associated with an increase in analyst coverage and an improvement in the accuracy of analyst earnings forecasts.Link

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GE Capital after the Crisis

GE Capital after the Crisis. John Coates, John Dionne, David S. Scharfstein, April 2017, Case, “Keith Sherin, CEO of GE Capital, faced a decision on which hinged billions of dollars and the fate of one of America’s most storied companies. On his desk sat two secret analyses: Project Beacon, a proposal to spin off most of GE Capital to GE shareholders, and Project Hubble, a proposal to sell off GE Capital in parts. A third document sketched out the implications should GE “stay the course” on its present strategy: a continued, massive build-up of regulatory and compliance personnel to meet GE Capital’s obligations as a “SIFI”—systemically important financial institution—in the wake of the 2010 Dodd-Frank Act.Link

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Harvard’s Scott Says U.S. Has Latitude on Bank Reforms

Harvard’s Scott Says U.S. Has Latitude on Bank Reforms. Hal Scott, March 23, 2017, Video, “Hal Scott, Harvard Law School professor and president of Committee on Capital Markets Regulation, discusses the Trump administration’s approach to financial regulation and how it relates to the Federal Reserve and monetary policy. Scott is a potential candidate to be the next Vice Chair of the Federal Reserve. He speaks on “Bloomberg Surveillance.”Link

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Mnuchin’s Mission

Mnuchin’s Mission. Jeffrey Frankel, March 22, 2017, Opinion, “US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin is hemmed in on all sides. Domestically, he’s trapped between the promises he has made (such as the “Mnuchin rule” that taxes wouldn’t be cut for the rich), the actions of President Donald Trump (whose tax plan includes cuts for the rich), and simple arithmetic (which makes the administration’s conflicting pledges impossible to fulfill). But even on the international stage, where US treasury secretaries typically enjoy more latitude and esteem, Mnuchin is likely to have a hard time.Link

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The Disappointing Recovery of Output after 2009

The Disappointing Recovery of Output after 2009. James Stock, March 10, 2017, Paper, “U.S. output has been expanding only slowly since the recession trough in 2009 even though unemployment has declined as fast as previous recoveries. We use a quantitative growth-accounting decomposition to explore explanations for the output shortfall, giving full treatment to cyclical effects that, given the depth of the recession, should have implied unusually fast growth. We find that the growth shortfall has almost entirely reflected two factors: TFP has grown slowly and labor force participation fell. Both factors reflect powerful adverse forces largely—if not entirely—unrelated to the financial crisis and the U.S. recession. Indeed, these forces fairly clearly were in play before the recession. The noncyclical forces we study resulted in a shortfall of capital formation that holds back output even today.Link

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The Financial Regulatory Reform Agenda in 2017

The Financial Regulatory Reform Agenda in 2017. Robin Greenwood, Samuel Hanson, Jeremy Stein, Adi Sunderam, February 2017, Paper, “We take stock of the post-crisis financial regulatory reform agenda. We highlight and summarize areas of clear progress, where post-crisis reforms should either be maintained or built upon. We then identify several areas where the new regulations could be streamlined or rolled back in an effort to reduce the burden on the financial sector, particularly on smaller banks.Link

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Larry Summers is worried about ‘enormous damage’ to the economy

Larry Summers is worried about ‘enormous damage’ to the economy. Lawrence Summers, February 27, 2017, Video, “Former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers had strong words for the economic policies and the rhetoric coming from the Trump Administration. In a wide-ranging interview in his offices at Harvard University, Summers called the new administration’s pronouncements on trade for instance “wildly irresponsible” and “potentially very dangerous.” ” Link

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How The Great Recession Changed Economic Thought

How The Great Recession Changed Economic Thought. Edward Glaeser, 2017, Book, “The past three decades have been characterized by vast change and crises in global financial markets—and not in politically unstable countries but in the heart of the developed world, from the Great Recession in the United States to the banking crises in Japan and the Eurozone. As we try to make sense of what caused these crises and how we might reduce risk factors and prevent recurrence, the fields of finance and economics have also seen vast change, as scholars and researchers have advanced their thinking to better respond to the recent crises.Link

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