Found 417 article(s) in category 'Q3: Financial Crisis?'

HOW DO WE PREVENT THE NEXT FINANCIAL CRISIS?

The posts collected here explore the causes of the global financial crisis and its short- and long-term consequences. They include a multitude of proposals for preventing and mitigating financial crises in the future.

Dealing with Monetary Paralysis at the Zero Bound

Dealing with Monetary Paralysis at the Zero Bound. Kenneth Rogoff, Summer 2017, Paper, “Recently, the key constraint for central banks is the zero lower bound on nominal interest rates. Central banks fear that if they push short-term policy interest rates too deeply negative, there will be a massive flight into paper currency. This paper asks whether, in a world where paper currency is becoming increasingly vestigial outside small transactions (at least in the legal, tax compliant economy), there might be relatively simple ways to finesse the zero bound without affecting how most ordinary people live. Surprisingly, this question gets little attention compared to the massive number of articles that take the zero bound as given and look for out-of-the-box solutions for dealing with it. In an inversion of the old joke, it is a bit as if the economics literature has insisted on positing ‘assume we don’t have a can opener,’ without considering the possibility that we might be able to devise one. It makes sense not to wait until the next financial crisis to develop plans.Link

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Recovery is Not Resolution

Recovery is Not Resolution. Carmen Reinhart, August 1, 2017, Opinion, “Earlier this year, the consensus view among economists was that the United States would outstrip its advanced-economy rivals. The expected US growth spurt would be driven by the economic stimulus package described in President Donald Trump’s election campaign. But the most notable positive economic news of 2017 among the developed countries has been coming from Europe.Link

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Central Bankers Should’ve Been More Aggressive

Central Bankers Should’ve Been More Aggressive. Kenneth Rogoff, July 20, 2017, Audio, “Kenneth Rogoff, a professor at Harvard University, says central bankers should’ve been more aggressive during the financial crisis and that India’s demonetization was done too quickly. Prior to that, Kathy Matsui, chief Japan equity strategist at Goldman Sachs Japan, says Japanese companies are strong. Robert Shiller, a professor at Yale University, says New York City housing is more affordable than people think. Finally, New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu says Washington’s stuck making the same mistakes in health care.Link

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Research: Hiring Chief Risk Officers Led Banks to Take on Even More Risk

Research: Hiring Chief Risk Officers Led Banks to Take on Even More Risk. Frank Dobbin, July 12, 2017, “Risk taking by big U.S. banks exploded in the years leading up to the 2008 financial crisis, with disastrous consequences for American firms, markets, and households. Much of the added risk, of course, came in the form of complex, opaque financial instruments like derivatives, the “financial weapons of mass destruction” that played such a central role in the crisis and the panic that followed.Link

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China Could Export a Recession to Everyone Else

China Could Export a Recession to Everyone Else. Kenneth Rogoff, July 5, 2017, Video, “Soaring debt levels in China were a serious concern as the fallout of any crisis would hit everyone else, said a former International Monetary Fund (IMF) economist on Thursday. “If there’s a country in the world which is really going to affect everyone else and which is vulnerable, it’s got to be China today,” Kenneth Rogoff, economics professor at Harvard University, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Thursday.Link

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Populism and the Economics of Globalization

Populism and the Economics of Globalization. Dani Rodrik, June 2017, Paper, “Populism may seem like it has come out of nowhere, but it has been on the rise for a while. I argue that economic history and economic theory both provide ample grounds for anticipating that advanced stages of economic globalization would produce a political backlash. While the backlash may have been predictable, the specific form it took was less so. I distinguish between left-wing and right-wing variants of populism, which differ with respect to the societal cleavages that populist politicians highlight. The first has been predominant in Latin America, and the second in Europe. I argue that these different reactions are related to the relative salience of different types of globalization shocks.Link

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What Corporate Bankruptcy Can Teach Us About Morality

What Corporate Bankruptcy Can Teach Us About Morality. Mihir Desai, June 27, 2017, Audio, “Does the world of finance and markets needs a good infusion of humanity? One book examines how how a wider reading of the humanities can help you understand finance and — at the same time — how finance can help you understand the human condition. It’s by economist and Harvard Business School Professor Mihir Desai.  He joined Marketplace Morning Report host David Brancaccio to discuss his latest book, “The Wisdom of Finance: Discovering Humanity in the World of Risk and Return.”Link

 

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