Found 1235 article(s) in category 'Economic Growth'

Household Matters: Revisiting the Returns to Capital among Female Micro-entrepreneurs

Household Matters: Revisiting the Returns to Capital among Female Micro-entrepreneurs. Rohini Pande, April 17, 2017, Paper, “Several field experiments find positive returns to grants for male and not female microentrepreneurs. But, these analyses largely overlook that male and female micro-entrepreneurs often belong to the same household. Using data from randomized trials in India, Sri Lanka and Ghana, we show that the gender gap in microenterprise performance is not due to a gap in aptitude. Instead, low average returns of female-run enterprises are observed because women’s capital is invested into their husbands’ enterprises rather than their own. When women are the sole household enterprise operator, capital shocks lead to large increases in profits. Household-level income gains are equivalent regardless of the grant or loan recipient’s gender.” Link

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Multinational Activity in Emerging Markets: How and When Does Foreign Direct Investment Promote Growth?

Multinational Activity in Emerging Markets: How and When Does Foreign Direct Investment Promote Growth? Laura Alfaro, 2017, Paper, “Among the prominent economic trends in recent decades is the exponential increase in flows of goods and capital driven by technological progress and falling of restrictions. A key driver of this phenomenon has been the cross-border production, foreign investment, and trade both final and intermediate goods by multinational corporations. Research has sought to understand how foreign direct investment (FDI) affects host economies. This paper reviews the main theories and empirical evidence of two streams of literature: the mechanisms by which multinational activity might create positive effects and externalities to countries and the role of complementary local conditions, also known as “absorptive capacities,” that allow a country to reap the benefits of FDI paying particular attention to the role of factor markets, reallocation effects, and the linkages generated between foreign and domestic firms.Link

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Larry Summers Sees More Downside Risks

Larry Summers Sees More Downside Risks. Lawrence Summers, April 12, 2017, Video, “Former U.S. Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers said that while it’s difficult to call a market top, valuations have gotten ahead of the economy in recent months. “I’m not sure that I see what in the economy would justify a market move of the magnitude we’ve seen in the last months,” Summers said in an interview Wednesday on Bloomberg Television. “It wouldn’t surprise me if people look back and see that there was a bit of a sugar high in some of the valuations that we’re seeing.”” Link

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Coordination Frictions in Venture Capital Syndicates

Coordination Frictions in Venture Capital Syndicates. Ramana Nanda, Matthew Rhodes-Kropf, April 11, 2017, Paper, “An extensive literature on venture capital has studied asymmetric information and agency problems between investors and entrepreneurs, examining how separating entrepreneurs from the investor can create frictions that might inhibit the funding of good projects. It has largely abstracted away from the fact that a startup typically does not have just one investor, but several VCs that come together in a syndicate to finance a venture. In this chapter, we therefore argue for an expansion of the standard perspective to also include frictions within VC syndicates.Link

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Too Late to Compensate Free Trade’s Losers

Too Late to Compensate Free Trade’s Losers. Dani Rodrik, April 11, 2017, Opinion, “It appears that a new consensus has taken hold these days among the world’s business and policy elites about how to address the anti-globalization backlash that populists such as Donald Trump have so ably exploited. Gone are the confident assertions that globalization benefits everyone: we must, the elites now concede, accept that globalization produces both winners and losers. But the correct response is not to halt or reverse globalization; it is to ensure that the losers are compensated.Link

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Concentrating on the Fall of the Labor Share

Concentrating on the Fall of the Labor Share. Lawrence Katz, April 2017, Paper, “In this paper, we discuss an explanation for the fall in share of labour in GDP based on the rise of “superstar firms.” If globalization or technological changes advantage the most productive firms in each industry, product market concentration will rise as industries become increasingly dominated by superstar firms with high profit margins and a low share of labor in firm value-added and sales. As the importance of superstar firms increases, the aggregate labour share will fall. This hypothesis suggests that sales will increasingly concentrate in a small number of firms and that industries where concentration rises most will have the largest declines in the labour share. We find support for these predictions aggregating up micro-data from the US Census 1982-2012.Link

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America’s Economy and the Case for Free Markets

America’s Economy and the Case for Free Markets. N. Gregory Mankiw, April 9, 2017, Video, “The Harvard economics professor on the economy and our need for free markets. Click “Show more” to view chapters. For more conversations, visit htttp://conversationswithbillkristol.org Chapter 1 (00:15 – 45:37): The State of the U.S. Economy Chapter 2 (45:37 – 1:06:03): The Case for Free Markets Greg Mankiw is a professor of economics at Harvard University and was chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President George W. Bush (2003-2005). In this Conversation, Mankiw analyzes the American economy and shares his perspective on current public policy debates about trade, immigration, technological innovation, jobs, and economic growth. Reflecting on the economic challenges the U.S. faces today, Mankiw makes the case for a robust commitment to free markets—both for the sake of America and for the world.Link

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Growing Out of Populism?

Growing Out of Populism? Kenneth Rogoff, April 4, 2017, Opinion, “After nine dreary years of downgrading their GDP forecasts, macroeconomic policymakers around the world are shaking their heads in disbelief: Despite a populist-propelled wave of political tumult, global growth is actually set to outperform expectations in 2017. It’s not just American exceptionalism. Although US growth is very strong, Europe has been outperforming expectations by more. There is even happy news for emerging markets, which are still bracing for US Federal Reserve interest-rate hikes but have gained a better backdrop against which to adjust.Link

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Collaborative is Superadditive in Political Economics

Collaborative is Superadditive in Political Economics. Richard Zeckhauser, 2017, Book Chapter, “This collection gathers some of the greatest minds in economics to discuss their experiences of collaborative research and publication. Nobel Prize winners and other eminent scholars from a representative sample of economics’ major sub-disciplines share how and why they came to work primarily in partnerships or on their own, whether naturally or by necessity. The contributions include discussions of personal experiences, statistical analyses, different levels of investment, and how the digital age has changed researcher interactions. As budget cuts and resource consolidation make working together vital in ever more fields of academia, this book offers valuable advice to help young and seasoned scholars alike identify the right co-author(s).Link

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The Rise of Economic Insecurity in the EU: Concepts and Measures

The Rise of Economic Insecurity in the EU: Concepts and Measures. Jason Beckfield, 2017, Paper, “Economic instability, an array of social changes, and welfare state retrenchment place the question of economic insecurity high on the scholarly and political agenda. We contribute to thesedebates by drawing conceptual distinctions between inequality and insecurity. Fundamentally,inequality concerns the distribution of resources across individuals, while insecurity concerns exposure to multiple social risks that can deteriorate living conditions. The multiplicity and dynamism of insecurity inform our development of a new measure of economic insecurity, using longitudinal data from the EU-SILC database. Substantively, we then use our new measure to analyze the distribution of insecurity in Europe.Link

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