Found 1292 article(s) in category 'Economic Growth'

New Development Economics – We Shall Experiment, but How Shall We Learn?

New Development Economics – We Shall Experiment, but How Shall We Learn? Dani Rodrik, 2008, Book Chapter, “Development economics has long been split between the study of macro-development (economic growth, international trade, and fiscal/macro-policies) and microdevelopment (microfinance, education, health, and other social programs). Even though the central…Link

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Arbitrage in Housing Markets

Arbitrage in Housing Markets. Edward Glaeser, December 15, 2007, Paper. “Urban economists understand housing prices with a spatial equilibrium approach that assumes people must be indifferent across locations. Since the spatial no arbitrage condition is inherently imprecise, other economists have turned to different no arbitrage conditions, such as the prediction that individuals must be indifferent between owning and renting. This paper argues the predictions from these non-spatial, financial no arbitrage conditions are also quite imprecise. Owned homes are extremely different from rental units and owners are…” Link

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Did the Death of Distance Hurt Detroit and Help New York?

Did the Death of Distance Hurt Detroit and Help New York? Edward Glaeser, Giacomo Ponzetto, December 2007, Paper. “Urban proximity can reduce the costs of shipping goods and speed the flow of ideas. Improvements in communication technology might erode these advantages and allow people and firms to decentralize. However, improvements in transportation and communication technology can also increase the returns to new ideas, by allowing those ideas to be used throughout the world. This paper presents a model that illustrates these two rival effects that technological progress can have on cities…” Link

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Latin America and The World Economy

Latin America and The World Economy. Dale Jorgenson, October 29, 2007, Book Chapter. “This paper analyzes the impact of investment in information technology (IT) on the recent resurgence of growth in Latin America and the world economy. We describe the growth of the world economy, seven regions, including Latin America, and fourteen major economies during the period 1989-2005. We allocate the growth of world output between input growth and productivity and find, surprisingly, that input growth greatly predominates! Moreover, differences in per capita output levels are explained by differences in per capita input, rather than…” Link

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Slavery, Inequality, and Economic Development in the Americas: An Examination of the Engerman-Sokoloff Hypothesis

Slavery, Inequality, and Economic Development in the Americas: An Examination of the Engerman-Sokoloff Hypothesis, Nathan Nunn, October 2007, Book Chapter. “Recent research argues that among former New World colonies a nation’s past dependence on slave labor was important for its subsequent economic development (Engerman and Sokoloff, 1997, 2002). It is argued that specialization in plantation agriculture, with its use of slave labor, caused economic inequality, which concentrated power in the hands of a small elite, adversely affecting the development of domestic institutions needed for sustained economic growth…” Link

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Entrepreneurship and the City

Entrepreneurship and the City. Edward Glaeser, October 2007, Paper. “Why do levels of entrepreneurship differ across America’s cities? This paper presents basic facts on two measures of entrepreneurship: the self-employment rate and the number of small firms. Both of these measures are correlated with urban success, suggesting that more entrepreneurial cities are more successful. There is considerable variation in the self-employment rate across metropolitan areas, but about one-half of this heterogeneity can be explained by demographic and industrial variation. Self-employment is particularly associated with abundant, older…” Link

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DAMS

DAMS. Rohini Pande, October 2007, Paper: “This paper studies the productivity and distributional effects of large irrigation dams in India. Our instrumental variable estimates exploit the fact that river gradient affects a district’s suit- ability for dams. In districts located downstream from a dam, agricultural production increases, and vulnerability to rainfall shocks declines. In contrast, agricultural production shows an in- significant increase in the district where the dam is located but its volatility increases. Rural poverty declines in downstream districts but increases in the district where the dam is built, suggesting that neither markets nor state institutions have alleviated the adverse distributional impacts of dam construction.” Link

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Competition and Productivity Growth in South Africa

Competition and Productivity Growth in South Africa. Philippe Aghion, August 2007, Paper. “Using three different panel data sets, we show: (i) that mark-ups are significantly higher in South African manufacturing industries than they are in corresponding industries worldwide; (ii) that competition policy (i.e a reduction of mark-ups) should have largely positive effects on productivity growth in South Africa…” Link

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The choice of institutions

The choice of institutions. Alberto Alesina, August 2007, Paper. “The ”classical” economists, Adam Smith, David Ricardo and Karl Marx clearly thought that in socio political forces were important determinants of economic development and change. On the contrary the “neoclassical” school starting with Jevons and Walras developed their economic theories in an institution free environment. Institution free economic theory has been the dominant school of thought at least until the 1990s. There were however a few exceptions…” Link

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The Product Space Conditions in the Development of Nations

The Product Space Conditions in the Development of Nations. Ricardo Hausmann, July 27, 2007, Paper. “Economies grow by upgrading the products they produce and export. The technology, capital, institutions, and skills needed to make newer products are more easily adapted from some products than from others. Here, we study this network of relatedness between products, or “product space,” finding that more-sophisticated products are located in a densely connected core whereas less-sophisticated products occupy a less-connected periphery. Empirically, countries move through the product space by developing goods close to those…” Link

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