Found 323 article(s) in category 'Q2: Inequality?'

Inequality in Cities

Inequality in CitiesEdward Glaeser, Kristina Tobio, October 1, 2009, Paper. “Much of the inequality literature has focused on national inequality, but local inequality is also important. Crime rates are higher in more unequal cities; people in unequal cities are more likely to say that they are unhappy. There is a negative association between local inequality and the growth of city-level income and population, once we control for the initial distribution of skills. High levels of mobility across cities mean that city-level inequality should not be studied with the same analytical tools used…” May require purchase or user account. Link

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The Future of Inequality: The Other Reason Education Matters So Much

The Future of Inequality: The Other Reason Education Matters So Much, Lawrence Katz, Claudia Goldin, August 22, 2009, Paper. “As almost every economic policy maker is aware, the gap between the wages of educated and less-educated workers has been growing since the early 1980s – and that change has been both large and pervasive even when the measurement is narrowed by gender, industry or occupation. What’s not widely known, though, is that expanding wage inequality is a relatively new phenomenon. In fact, inequality actually narrowed from around 1910 to the 1950s, and then remained fairly stable until the 1980s…” Link 

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Variance Function Regressions for Studying Inequality

Variance Function Regressions for Studying Inequality. Bruce Western, January 2009, Paper. “Regression-based studies of inequality model only between-group differences, yet often these differences are far exceeded by residual inequality. Residual inequality is usually attributed to measurement error or the influence of unobserved characteristics. We present a regression that includes covariates for both the mean and variance of a dependent variable. In this model, the residual variance is treated as a target for analysis. In analyses of inequality, the residual variance might be interpreted as measuring risk or insecurity …” Link

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Employment Discrimination and the Changing Landscape of Low-Wage Labor Markets

Employment Discrimination and the Changing Landscape of Low-Wage Labor Markets. Bruce Western, 2009, Paper. “A large body of theoretical and empirical research would lead us to predict a steady decline in discrimination, but several features of contemporary low-wage labor markets may function to sustain or renew racialized decision-making. Shifts in the composition of both low-wage jobs and workers have potentially created new incentives and opportunities for employers to enact racial preferences in the selection of workers.Link

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The New Development Economics

The New Development Economics. Dani Rodrik, October 29, 2008, Book Chapter. “Development economics is split between macro-development economists – who focus on economic growth, international trade, and fiscal/macro policies – and micro-development economists – who study microfinance, education, health, and other social programs. Recently there has been substantial convergence in the policy mindset exhibited by micro evaluation enthusiasts, on the one hand, and growth diagnosticians, on the other. At the same time, the randomized evaluation revolution has led to an accentuation of the methodological divergence…Link

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Assessing the Importance of Financial Literacy

Assessing the Importance of Financial Literacy. Shawn Cole, September 2008, Paper. “Financial decisions can be difficult. Comparing savings or borrowing options with different interest rates and term structures can be difficult for those without financial savvy—and even a knowledgeable individual may need to rely on calculators or spreadsheets to make truly informed decisions. Yet, many households are not knowledgeable, and often receive little assistance when making these decisions. Moreover, unlike the decision to visit a restaurant or purchase a particular car, customers may not receive useful feedback on the value…Link

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Inequality and Corruption: Evidence from US States

Inequality and Corruption: Evidence from US States, James E. Alt, August 25, 2008, Paper. “High-quality data on state-level inequality and incomes, panel data on corruption convictions, and careful attention to the consequences of including or excluding fixed effects in the panel specification allow us to estimate the impact of income considerations on the decision to undertake corrupt acts. Following efficiency wage arguments, for a given institutional environment the corruptible employee’s or official’s decision to engage in corruption is affected by relative wages and expected tenure in the public sector…” Link

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Why Doesn’t Capital Flow from Rich to Poor Countries? An Empirical Investigation

Why Doesn’t Capital Flow from Rich to Poor Countries? An Empirical Investigation. Laura Alfaro, May 2008, Paper. “We examine the empirical role of different explanations for the lack of flows of capital from rich to poor countries—the ‘Lucas Paradox.’ The theoretical explanations include cross country differences in fundamentals that affect productivity and capital market imperfections. We show that during 1970−2000 low institutional quality is the leading explanation. Improving Peru’s institutional quality to Australia’s level implies a quadrupling of foreign investmentRecent studies emphasize the role of…” Link

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Transitions: Career and Family Life Cycles of the Educational Elite

Transitions: Career and Family Life Cycles of the Educational Elite. Lawrence Katz, Claudia Goldin, 2008, Paper. “Among life’s most vital transitions are those concerning family and career. We decide when and whom to marry, how many children to have, whether to further our education, and which occupations and jobs to pursue. Fundamental aspects of these transitions began to change around the early 1970s for the college educated generally, and for women in particular. The median age at first marriage among college graduate women, which had been stable at about 22.5 years old from the 1950s to the early 1970s (for birth cohorts from…” Link

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Exploring the Impact of Financial Incentives on Stereotype Threat: Evidence from a Pilot Study

Exploring the Impact of Financial Incentives on Stereotype Threat: Evidence from a Pilot Study. Roland Fryer, 2008, Paper, “Motivated in part by large and persistent gender gaps in labor market outcomes (e.g., Claudia Goldin 1994; Joseph G. Altonji and Rebecca M. Blank 1998), a large body of experimental research has been devoted to understanding gender differences in behavior and responses to stimuli.1 An influential finding in experimental psychology is the presence of stereotype threat: making gender salient induces large gender gaps in performance on math tests (Steven J. Spencer, Claude M. Steele, and Diane M. Quinn 1999). For instance, when Spencer et al. (1999) informed subjects that women tended to under perform men on the math test they were about to take, women’s test scores dropped by 50 per? cent or more compared to a similar math test in which subjects were not informed of previous gender differences.Link

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