Found 323 article(s) in category 'Q2: Inequality?'

Just Business: Multinational Corporations and Human Rights

Just Business: Multinational Corporations and Human Rights. John Gerard Ruggie , 2013, Book. “One of the most vexing human rights issues of our time has been how to protect the rights of individuals and communities worldwide in an age of globalization and multinational business. Indeed, from Indonesian sweatshops to oil-based violence in Nigeria, the challenges of regulating harmful corporate practices in some of the world’s most difficult regions long seemed insurmountable. Human rights groups and businesses were locked in a stalemate, unable to find common ground. In 2005, the United Nations…” May require purchase or user account. Link

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Does the Classic Microfinance Model Discourage Entrepreneurship Among the Poor? Experimental Evidence from India

Does the Classic Microfinance Model Discourage Entrepreneurship Among the Poor? Experimental Evidence from India, Rohini Pande, January 2013, Paper, “Do the repayment requirements of the classic microfinance contract inhibit investment in high-return but illiquid business oppor- tunities among the poor? Using a field experiment, we compare the classic contract which requires that repayment begin immediately after loan disbursement to a contract that includes a two-month grace period. The provision of a grace period increased short-run business investment and long-run profits but also default rates. The results, thus, indicate that debt contracts that require early re- payment discourage illiquid risky investment and thereby limit the potential impact of microfinance on microenterprise growth and household poverty.” Link

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The Evolution of Ideology, Fairness and Redistribution

The Evolution of Ideology, Fairness and Redistribution. Alberto Alesina, December 2012, Paper. “Ideas about what is ‘fair’ influence preferences for redistribution. We study the dynamic evolution of different economies in which redistributive policies, perception of fairness, inequality and growth are jointly determined. We show how including beliefs about fairness can keep two otherwise identical countries on different development paths for a very long time. We show how different initial conditions regarding how ‘fair’ is the same level of inequality can lead to…” Link

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The Most Egalitarian of All Professions: Pharmacy and the Evolution of a Family-Friendly Occupation

The Most Egalitarian of All Professions: Pharmacy and the Evolution of a Family-Friendly Occupation. Claudia Goldin, Lawrence Katz, September 2012, Paper. “Pharmacy has become a female-majority profession that is highly remunerated with a small gender earnings gap and low earnings dispersion relative to other occupations. We sketch a labor market framework based on the theory of equalizing differences to integrate and interpret our empirical findings on earnings, hours of work, and the part-time work wage penalty for pharmacists. Using extensive surveys of pharmacists for…” (May require user account or purchase) Link

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The Global Gender Gap Report 2012

The Global Gender Gap Report 2012, Ricardo Hausmann, 2012, Paper. “The Global Gender Gap Index introduced by the World Economic Forum in 2006, is a framework for capturing the magnitude and scope of gender-based disparities and tracking their progress. The Index benchmarks national gender gaps on economic, political, education- and health-based criteria, and provides country rankings that allow for effective comparisons across regions and income groups, and over time. The rankings are designed to create greater awareness among a global audience of the challenges posed by gender gaps and the opportunities created by reducing them…” Link

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Cohort Change and Racial Differences in Educational and Income Mobility

Cohort Change and Racial Differences in Educational and Income Mobility. Bruce Western, December 22, 2011, Paper. “Policy reforms and rising income inequality transformed educational and economic opportunities for Americans approaching midlife in the 1990s. Rising income inequality may have reduced mobility, as income gaps increased between rich and poor children. Against the effects of rising inequality, Civil Rights reforms may have increased mobility, as opportunities expanded across cohorts of black students and workers. We compare educational and income mobility for two cohorts of black and white men, the older born in the late 1940s…” Link

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The For-Profit Postsecondary School Sector: Nimble Critters or Agile Predators?

The For-Profit Postsecondary School Sector: Nimble Critters or Agile Predators? David Deming, Claudia Goldin, Lawrence Katz, December 2011, Paper. “Private for-profit institutions have been the fastest growing part of the U.S. higher education sector. For-profit enrollment increased from 0.2 percent to 9.1 percent of total enrollment in degree-granting schools from 1970 to 2009, and for-profit institutions account for the majority of enrollments in non-degree granting postsecondary schools. We describe the schools, students, and programs in the for-profit higher education sector, its phenomenal recent growth, and its relationship to the…” Link

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Network Effects and Social Inequality

Network Effects and Social Inequality. Filiz Garip, December 2011, Paper. “Students of social inequality have noted the presence of mechanisms militating toward cumulative advantage and increasing inequality. Social scientists have established that individuals’ choices are influenced by those of their network peers in many social domains. We suggest that the ubiquity of network effects and tendencies toward cumulative advantage are related …” Link

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The No-Growth Trap

The No-Growth Trap. Benjamin Friedman, November 2011, Opinion. “Well before the summer’s horrific shootings in Norway, many citizens of the Western democracies had the sense that the social fabric was fraying in unexpected places. The Danes restricted immigration in violation of the European Union’s Schengen Agreement. The lower house of the Dutch parliament voted—by nearly four to one—to outlaw ritual Muslim butchers (and, along the way, kosher butchers too). The French banned burkas in the streets. The Swiss banned minarets. In America, we are fighting over whether to build a wall between Texas and Mexico…” Link

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