Found 323 article(s) in category 'Q2: Inequality?'

Crumbling American Dreams

Crumbling American Dreams. Robert D. Putnam, August 3, 2013, Opinion. “My hometown — Port Clinton, Ohio, population 6,050 — was in the 1950s a passable embodiment of the American dream, a place that offered decent opportunity for the children of bankers and factory workers alike. But a half-century later, wealthy kids park BMW convertibles in the Port Clinton High School lot next to decrepit “junkers” in which homeless classmates live. The American dream has morphed into a split-screen American nightmare. And the story of this small town, and…” Link verified October 6, 2014

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The Decline, Rebound, and Further Rise in SNAP Enrollment: Disentangling Business Cycle Fluctuations and Policy Changes

The Decline, Rebound, and Further Rise in SNAP Enrollment: Disentangling Business Cycle Fluctuations and Policy Changes. Peter Ganong, Jeffrey Liebman, August 2013, Paper. “Approximately 1-in-7 people and 1-in-4 children received benefits from the US Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) in July 2011, both all-time highs. We analyze changes in SNAP takeup over the past two decades. From 1994 to 2001, coincident with welfare reform, take-up fell from 75% to 54% of eligible people. The take-up rate then rebounded, and, following several policy changes to improve program access, stabilized at 69% in…” Link

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Inequality and Decision Making: Imagining a New Line of Inquiry

Inequality and Decision Making: Imagining a New Line of Inquiry, David Moss, June 14, 2013, Paper. “The substantial increase in inequality in the United States over the past three decades has provoked considerable debate, with some analysts characterizing rising inequality as among the greatest threats facing the nation and others dismissing it as little more than a hiccup – or even celebrating it as a favorable development – in the progress of American capitalism. Despite numerous claims in popular venues that high inequality has slowed growth, precipitated financial instability…” Link

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Titles of Nobility: Property, Poverty, and Immigration in a Free and Democratic Society

Titles of Nobility: Property, Poverty, and Immigration in a Free and Democratic Society, Joseph William Singer, June 12, 2013, Paper. “Both property and immigration are premised on exclusion yet both human rights and democratic norms require us to treat every human being with equal concern and respect. While neither sovereigns nor owners can have completely open borders, they have obligations to respect the human dignity of “the stranger.” Biblical sources link the stranger with the poor and develop a version of the Golden Rule that requires both to be accorded “love.”…” May require purchase or user account. Link

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Rising Extreme Poverty in the United States and the Response of Federal Means-Tested Transfer Programs

Rising Extreme Poverty in the United States and the Response of Federal Means-Tested Transfer Programs, Kathryn Edin, June 2013, Paper. “This study documents an increase in the prevalence of extreme poverty among US households with children between 1996 and 2011 and assesses the response of major federal means-tested transfer programs. Extreme poverty is defined using a World Bank metric of global poverty: $2 or less, per person, per day. Using the 1996–2008 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP), we estimate that in mid-2011, 1.65 million households with…” May require purchase or user account. Link

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The Slowdown in the Economic Assimilation of Immigrants: Aging and Cohort Effects Revisited Again.

The Slowdown in the Economic Assimilation of Immigrants: Aging and Cohort Effects Revisited Again. George Borjas, June 2013, Paper. “This paper examines the evolution of immigrant earnings in the United States between 1970 and 2010. There are cohort effects not only in wage levels, with more recent cohorts having lower entry wages through 1990, but also in the rate of wage growth, with more recent cohorts experiencing less economic assimilation. The slowdown in assimilation is partly related to a concurrent decline in the rate at which the new immigrants add to their human capital stock, as measured by English language proficiency. The data also suggest that the rate of economic assimilation is significantly lower for larger national origin groups …” Link

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On the Origins of Gender Roles: Women and the Plough

On the Origins of Gender Roles: Women and the Plough. Alberto Alesina, Nathan Nunn, May 2013, Paper. “The study examines the historical origins of existing cross-cultural differences in beliefs and values regarding the appropriate role of women in society. We test the hypothesis that traditional agricultural practices influenced the historical gender division of labor and the evolution of gender norms. We find that, consistent with existing hypotheses, the descendants of societies that traditionally practiced plough agriculture today have less equal gender norms, measured using…” Link Verified October 18, 2014

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Achieving Escape Velocity: Neighborhood and School Interventions to Reduce Persistent Inequality

Achieving Escape Velocity: Neighborhood and School Interventions to Reduce Persistent Inequality. Roland Fryer, Lawrence Katz, 2013, Paper. “This paper reviews the evidence on the efficacy of neighborhood and school interventions in improving the long-run outcomes of children growing up in poor families. We focus on studies exploiting exogenous sources of variation in neighborhoods and schools and which examine at least medium-term outcomes. Higher-quality neighborhoods improve family safety, adult subjective well-being and health, and girls’ mental health. But they have no detectable impact on youth human…”  Link

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Defending the One Percent

Defending the One Percent. N. Gregory Mankiw, 2013, . “Imagine a society with perfect economic equality. Perhaps out of sheer coincidence, the supply and demand for different types of labor happen to produce an equilibrium in which everyone earns exactly the same income. As a result, no one worries about the gap between the rich and poor, and no one debates to what extent public policy should make income redistribution a priority. Because people earn the value of their marginal product, everyone has the appropriate incentive to provide the efficient amount of effort. The government is still needed to provide public goods, such as…”  Link verified March 28, 2014

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